Dr. Anthony Garcia seemed to lead a successful life, with a house on a quiet street in Terre Haute, Indiana, and a Ferrari parked in the driveway.

Behind closed doors, however, police say it seemed the opposite: His life was “falling apart.”

On Friday, NBC’s Dateline will explore the troubled life of Garcia, a once-promising University of Utah medical school graduate turned serial killer.

Police say he was driven by a years-long revenge plot after he was fired from Nebraska’s Creighton University in 2001 and was dogged by bad references from his former supervisors.

Garcia killed four people in two double murders, in 2008 and 2013, including one of the doctors who dismissed him from Creighton. One of his victims was an 11-year-old boy.

All four were viciously stabbed. In two of the killings, authorities say he left the same grisly signature: a knife stuck in the right side of their necks.

In 2013, Garcia was charged with four counts of first-degree murder. He was convicted in October. (His lawyers have said they will appeal.)

As an investigator describes in an exclusive clip from Friday’s Dateline, they discovered a disconcerting scene inside Garcia’s home: empty rooms and closets; a practically barren refrigerator; and mortgage and insurance policies and other financial documents stacked on the dining table.

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It turned out that Dr. Garcia was broke, and he was facing foreclosure on his home.

“Well, it appeared to us that he had made some deliberate attempt to kind of lay things out, so people could get his affairs in order,” Omaha, Nebraska, police detective Derek Mois tells Dateline‘s Josh Mankiewicz in the clip.

“And we see those things, as homicide investigators, when [we] investigate suicides.”

Investigators also combed through Garcia’s electronic devices and online data. Mois says in the clip that the former Creighton University pathology resident regularly visited strips clubs and liquor stores.
“He was not working regularly,” he says. “So it looked to us collectively like his life was falling apart.”

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