Dana Adel: Being patient and good listener are the qualities of a good sales person. Try to minimize the differences between you and your team.  Appreciate the good ideas and good work. You should not impose your decisions on your team instead create an atmosphere of sharing the responsibility. Holding regular meetings and discuss the issues in the meeting and take the decision with consensus rather than imposing orders.

What differentiates a manager from a team leader?


Image: author Dana Adel

 Provide an opportunity to every one  to speak out over every issue so that you can know what is there inside of their heart.  Make them feel  that they are being looked after well by you. You have to take the grip over your team slowly and steadily. Kill the difference between your team and yourself. Don't impose personal ideas on the team. Don't insist on your accuracy and final words. invite suggestions from the team.

A team leader is somebody who is, you've guessed it, in charge of a team.   They may or may not be a true leader in terms of their character.  In general, a team leader would report to a manager, who may manage several teams.
The crucial difference between a manager and a team leader is the paperwork.  A manager manages all aspects of his or her area of responsibility, which may include hiring, inventory control, statutory reporting, finance or other tasks.  A team leader normally does not have these responsibilities, and focuses on just the specific task of the team. 

1. Managers has his eye on the bottom line while leader has his eye on the horizon
2. Manager is a copy but Leader is the Original
3. Manager Imitates but leader originates
4. Manager maintains while leader develops
5. Manager accepts the status quo but leader challenges the status quo
6. Managers have employees while leaders win followers
7. Managers React to change but Leaders create change
8. Managers Communicate and leaders persuade
9. Managers direct groups but leaders create teams
10. Mangers take credit while leaders take responsibility
11. Managers exercise power over people but leaders develop power in people

This is probably impossible to answer because it generally depends heavily on the specifics of the organization. What one company calls a "team lead" another company might call a "manager" while other organizations may not make any sort of distinction between the two.

Broadly, though, if an organization makes a distinction between the two roles, it is likely that a "team lead" would be someone that spends part of their time doing the same thing that members of the team are doing and part of their time doing management tasks while a "manager" would be someone that no longer spends a significant fraction of their time doing the same things that the members of their team are doing in order to focus almost exclusively on management tasks. A "team lead" probably doesn't have HR responsibility for the members of the team (so the "team lead" probably doesn't do annual performance reviews, doesn't have responsibility for hiring and firing, etc.) while a "manager" probably does.

As I said initially, though, the exact parameters are likely to vary from one organization to another. There is no guarantee that one organization's "manager" isn't going to be spending a significant amount of time doing the same work their team is responsible for. And it's entirely possible that another organization's "team lead" is going to be responsible for hiring and firing.

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